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Topic: Tactics in space (Read 1453 times) previous topic - next topic

Tactics in space
So with all the discussion on strategy, what about tactics? As Sailor has stated: Every group has the right to make up their own tactics.
With that in mind, I do not seek to enforce anything I write here on to other people, but rather try to figure out which one might be really good. Once the dogfighter module is out, we might even try them :D
I'll start off with the one that sparked this topic, tho I will try to update this post once other people write down their own tactics.

Thach Weave:

Developed during World War 2 as a counter for the Japanese Zero planes compared to the much slower American Hellcats. I'm going to quote Wikipedia for the next part: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thach_weave
Quote
It was executed either by two fighter aircraft side-by-side or by two pairs of fighters flying together. When an enemy aircraft chose one fighter as his target (the "bait" fighter; his wingman being the "hook"), the two wingmen turned in towards each other. After crossing paths, and once their separation was great enough, they would then repeat the exercise, again turning in towards each other, bringing the enemy plane into the hook's sights. A correctly executed Thach Weave (assuming the bait was taken and followed) left little chance of escape to even the most maneuverable opponent.



So, in the simplest terms possible: One guy is the bait and the other gets a nice shot lined up and takes the bastard out.
Due to the nature of this tactic, it really should be performed by more heavy armoured fighters as light fighters will not be able to function as a bait for very long.
This tactic assumes that the Scythe is more manoeuvrable then, say, a Hornet. And that the Hornet can take the punishment.

Please share your thoughts, comments and other tactics that we can possible adapt for this game to use against our common foe.

Re: Tactics in space
Reply #1
The Thatch Weave is one of those maneuvers that looses much of it's utility with the ability to fire out of line with your vector. If I were chasing a pilot that went for this I'd just slew the nose rather than change course and as long as IFCS was off your wing man wouldn't have an intercept (at least without making a target of himself).

There are of course ways to use this anyway; for one the maneuvering thrusters aren't going to have anywhere near the delta of the main thrusters, thus you can still use the spirit of this maneuver (causing the enemy to fly a predictable course) to set up an easier attack.

I suspect that we will find similar things with most maneuvers used for air (or even naval) combat; the specifics of the maneuver are frankly useless, but if we drill down to the core reason for it we should have a way to apply it for similar results.

  • Harker
  • [*][*][*]
  • Enrolled
Re: Tactics in space
Reply #2
Yeah, many ships have a mix of fixed and articulated weaponry. It's interesting to note that several ships (Aurora, Scythe, Avenger, Merlin) only have fixed weapon hardpoints though. So hypothetically, against a scythe this would be an effective tactic.

Re: Tactics in space
Reply #3

Yeah, many ships have a mix of fixed and articulated weaponry. It's interesting to note that several ships (Aurora, Scythe, Avenger, Merlin) only have fixed weapon hardpoints though. So hypothetically, against a scythe this would be an effective tactic.


Doesn't matter; in the absence of aerodynamic friction so long as you have the ability to maneuver your ship without interference from the flight computer (aka: IFCS turned off, aka: full newtonian flight) you can point your "fixed" guns (by method of pointing your ship) along any vector you choose without regard to your vector of travel.

  • Andy_H
  • [*][*][*]
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  • NMC Ambassasdor.
Re: Tactics in space
Reply #4
So far it seems everyone has made valid observations. So I will try to add my own.

This tactic could be useful for less maneuverable ships with large missile loads like the Gladiator, Constellation, and Retaliator.

One could be along side a fighter patrol for fire support on space superiority missions. The reversed turn would be ideal for lining up a missile spread or maximum turret fire against an aggressor engaging a friendly fighter.

Yes, this is a limited application. Nor do we know how long it will take to down the aggressor ship. But we are talking about a very specific maneuver within a small scale engagement scenario.

  • Harker
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  • Enrolled
Re: Tactics in space
Reply #5

Doesn't matter; in the absence of aerodynamic friction so long as you have the ability to maneuver your ship without interference from the flight computer (aka: IFCS turned off, aka: full newtonian flight) you can point your "fixed" guns (by method of pointing your ship) along any vector you choose without regard to your vector of travel.


As long as ships aren't perfect spheres capable of emitting thrust from any point on the surface, then we won't have perfect three dimensional maneuvrability. I guess you're right but it's a lot harder to line up shots when you're not gunning straight at the opponent, so that could be a deterrent I guess.

  • Jonais
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  • Enrolled
Re: Tactics in space
Reply #6
In a 2v1 situation you're always going to have the 1 "following" one of the 2 so as long as there is some communication between the 2 the bait can line up the 1 into an ideal firing vector.
Tumbleweeds. A Lone Wolves inspired org.
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  • Harker
  • [*][*][*]
  • Enrolled
Re: Tactics in space
Reply #7
If the other two are communicating and working together properly (which takes practice) then they would probably have an advantage, but a skilful pilot in an agile ship could theoretically maneuvre himself to have one of his two targets blocking the other.